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System Current Draw

When you wire your car or truck with our Infinitybox system, you are adding a powerful electrical management system to your build.  We do so much more than a traditional wiring harness.  Our system has the power and intelligence to get you modern electrical control of your muscle car, restoration, street-rod, hot-rod, resto-mod, pro-touring car or race car.  Your Infinitybox system is awake and alive continuously so that it can respond immediately when you want to start the car, pop your trunk from our inLINK key fobs or control the system from your smart phone.

Wiring your car with the Infinitybox system gets you features that you cannot get from any traditional wiring harness but it does require more care & feeding.  Our system does have a parasitic draw on your battery when the car is sitting idle.  This is different than a traditional box of fuses and relays that has no active electronics in it.  We strongly recommend that you have a way to manage your battery for when you are not driving your car or truck.  There are three ways you can do this.

First, we always recommend a disconnect switch at the battery.  This is a quick and reliable way to disconnect the battery from your car’s electrical system.  This is a good idea for any car, even if you are not using the Infinitybox system to wire your car.  Other electronics systems that you add to your car, like electronic fuel injection systems, stereo equipment, will have parasitic draws from the battery.  A disconnect will help to keep your battery voltage up when you’re not driving the car.

Second, we always recommend some kind of trickle charger or maintainer for your battery for when your car is sitting idle.  This is true for any car, not just cars wired with our Infinitybox system.  You have many options for maintainer chargers from brands like Battery Tender, CTEK  and Schumacher.  Battery maintainers keep your battery voltage at its optimum level when the car is idle.  This will dramatically increase the life and reliability of your battery.

Lastly, our Infinitybox system has a unique accessory called inRESERVE.  inRESERVE is our active battery management feature.  The core of inRESERVE is a special latching solenoid that connects to a POWERCELL output.  The Infinitybox system is always watching and monitoring the battery voltage.  If the system sees the voltage start to get low, the POWERCELL sends a pulse to the special inRESERVE solenoid and disconnects all of the drain from the battery.  We build a lot of safety features into this system.  inRESERVE actively does its job if the battery drops below 12.3 volts, with the ignition off and stays at that level for 15 minutes.  This video talks through inRESERVE in more detail.

inRESERVE also gets you the disconnect feature that we mentioned in our first point above.  You can simply press the button included with your inRESERVE kit to disconnect the battery.  This adds a great security feature and lets you shut down power if the car is going to be sitting for extended periods of time.

We get a lot of questions about how much current the different components in the Infinitybox system draw when idle.  The MASTERCELL, POWERCELL and inMOTION cell each draw approximately 30 milliamps (0.03 amps) when they are powered up.  Adding the inLINK option adds approximately 10 milliamps to the MASTERCELL draw.  inVIRONMENT is in the range of 25 milliamps.  inTOUCH NET will draw 200 to 250 milliamps.

Please contact our team with any questions about the idle current draw of our Infinitybox system.  You can call us directly at (847) 232-1991 or you can click here to contact our team directly.

 

Jeep CJ7 Wiring Series- POWERCELL Locations

Over the next few videos, we’re going to continue our theme on good planning.  Specifically, we’re going to talk about picking the best locations for the major components that come with your Infinitybox system.  We’re installing our 20-Circuit Kit with inLINK and inRESERVE in our 1979 CJ7.  To get the most out of our install, we want to pick the best locations for the MASTERCELL, the front & rear POWERCELLs, the MEGA fuse holder and the inRESERVE solenoid.  We’ve broken this up into 5 different videos, talking about what you need to consider for each part.  This video covers picking the best locations for your front & rear POWERCELLs.

Side View of the Infinitybox POWERCELL

Side View of the Infinitybox POWERCELL

You get two POWERCELLs in your 20-Circuit Kit.  One for the front of your car and one for the rear.  The POWERCELLs are the remote fuse & relay boxes for your system.  They get commands sent to them from the MASTERCELL and they do the actual switching for all of your lights, ignition, starter, fuel pump, cooling fan, horn and other accessories.  You can learn more about the POWERCELL by clicking this link.

There are two important things to consider when you’re picking the best locations for your POWERCELLs.  First, you want the POWERCELLs as close to your electrical loads as possible.  This keeps the wiring short and makes it easy to install.  Your front POWERCELL is going to power your headlights, high-beams, turn signals, parking lights, ignition, starter, horn and dash.  You want to keep the front POWERCELL close to these loads to keep the wiring short.  Your rear POWERCELL is going to power your brake lights, turn signals, reverse lights, running lights, fuel pump and any audio that you have in the back of your car.

The other thing to consider when you pick your POWERCELL locations is that your POWERCELLs are the remote fuse boxes.  You need to have reasonable access to the POWERCELL to remove the protective cover and change the fuses.

In our 1979 Jeep CJ7, we’re going to mount the front POWERCELL on the inner driver’s fender.  There is a nice flat spot there to make mounting easy.  It is accessible for maintenance.  The 8-AWG power cables can be easily routed across the firewall to connect to the battery and the runs of wires to the loads are all relatively short.  Check out more detail on the location in this video.

We’re going to mount the front POWERCELL inside the rear passenger fender.  We will fabricate an enclosure inside the fender that is outside the travel for the suspension.  We’ll make a sealed cover over the enclosure so we can get to it easily for maintenance.  We can easily run the 8-AWG power feeds and the CAN cable down the passenger side of the Jeep.  Finally, the runs of wires to the brake lights, turn signals, running lights, reverse lights and fuel pump are all relatively short.  Check out more detail on the location in this video.

Picking the best locations for your POWERCELLs will make your wiring simple and efficient.  It will also make troubleshooting and diagnostics easier.  Keep watching for more in our 1979 Jeep CJ7 Install Series.

Be sure to subscribe to our YouTube channel and click the bell icon so you get notified when we post new videos in the series.

Click on this link to get to the main page for the 1979 Jeep CJ7 wiring project.  You can find all of the videos on one place there.  

You can also click here to contact our technical support team with any questions about your car or truck wiring project.  

 

Infinitybox CAD Models

Our customers are a unique breed of builder and fabricator.  They wire their cars and trucks with our Infinitybox system for a lot of different reasons.  To start, our system lets them simplify their wiring.  More importantly, our customers want more than just a plain, basic electrical system.  They want the same electrical features in their project that they have in their new, daily driver.  Our Infinitybox system lets them do that.  Since our customers are tinkers, makers and builders, they are using the latest solid modeling technology to virtually mock up their cars and trucks to make the project go more smoothly.  We get a lot of requests for CAD models for our cells, so we’ve made them available to our customers.

The introduction of on-line CAD tools like Audodesk’s Fusion 360 gives anyone in their garage access to very powerful and intuitive solid modeling tools.  You can import the CAD models for the Infinitybox MASTERCELLPOWERCELL and inMOTION cells into your projects.  You can check fitment, verify wire routing and make sure that you can access the cells, all in the computer before you cut any metal.

We have the solid models for the MASTERCELL, POWERCELL and inMOTION cells available in STEP and IGES formats.  Click on this link to contact our technical support team and we will send you the models.

Setting Infinitybox Address Jumpers

Our Infinitybox system is very flexible.  You can scale it from a very simple wiring system to one that is very complicated.  Our standard 20-Circuit Kit includes one MASTERCELL and two POWERCELLs.  You can add more POWERCELLs to expand the number of outputs in your system.  Every POWERCELL you add gives you 10 more outputs.  You can also add the inMOTION cell to control things like your power windows and power locks.  For all of these cells to work correctly on our Infinitybox CAN network, they each need their own address.  This is a unique name given to each cell so that it knows who it is and what commands it should listen to.  This blog post is going to go through setting the Infinitybox address jumpers.

There are address jumpers located under the clear covers of the POWERCELL and the inMOTION cell.  Setting the Infinitybox address jumpers is done in exactly the same way for both the POWERCELL and inMOTION.  The following illustration shows where the address jumpers are located under the POWERCELL cover.

POWERCELL Address Settings

POWERCELL Address Settings

The cells use BCD to set their address.  With BCD, you can use a small number of pins to set a large number of options.  In the case of our POWERCELLs and inMOTION cells, there are 4 sets of pins.  Each of these pins has a numerical value.  Going from left to right, these pins are 1, 2, 4 and 8.  When the cell power up, it looks at those pins to get its address.  It adds up the value of the pins that do not have a jumper on them.  For example, if there was no jumper on the first set of pins, that would be a value of 1.  If there was no number on the second set of pins, that would be a value of 2.  If there were no jumpers on the first and second set of pins, that would be a value of 3 (1 + 2).  The follow illustration shows the combinations of jumpers to get the most popular addresses used with our Infinitybox system.

How to set the address jumpers on the Infinitybox POWERCELL

How to set the address jumpers on the Infinitybox POWERCELL

In all standard 20-Circuit Kits.  The front POWERCELL is addressed as 1 and the rear POWERCELL is addressed as 2.  If you add inMOTION, that is addressed as 3.

The cells only learn their address the instant they are powered up.  If you change the address while the system is powered up, the cells will not change their address.  You should disconnect power from the system before you change any address headers.

When you are first setting up your 20-Circuit Kit.  You need to make sure that you have the POWERCELL jumpers set to the correct addresses for their location in your car.

Click on this link if you have any additional questions about setting the Infinitybox address jumpers.

1955 Chevy Bel Air wired with the Infinitybox System

1955 Chevy Bel Air- Great 8 Winner

Our Infinitybox team is thrilled to be a part of Bob Matranga’s 1955 Chevy Bel Air.  This car was awarded as one of the Great 8 winners for the 2020 Ridler Award at the Detroit Autorama.  The car is appropriately named Brute Force.

1955 Chevy Bel Air wired with the Infinitybox System

1955 Chevy Bel Air wired with the Infinitybox System

Bob and his team built a stunning 1955 Chevy Bel Air.  You could spend hours looking at all of the details in this car.  From the engine, to the chassis, to the one-off lights, to the leather treatment to the emblems, this is an impressive car.

1955 Chevy Bel Air wired with the Infinitybox System

1955 Chevy Bel Air wired with the Infinitybox System

1955 Chevy Bel Air wired with the Infinitybox System

1955 Chevy Bel Air wired with the Infinitybox System

1955 Chevy Bel Air wired with the Infinitybox System

1955 Chevy Bel Air wired with the Infinitybox System

You can see an interview with Bob going through the details of the car here.  Thanks to EClassic Autos for the video content.

1955 Chevy Bel Air: Great 8 Winner at 2020 Detroit Autorama from eclassicautos on Vimeo.

Bob’s team started with our Infinitybox 20-Circuit Kit to wire the car.  From there, they added inMOTION to control their power locks and power windows.  They added inLINK for remote control from a key fob.  inRESERVE for active battery management.  inTOUCH NET so they can control the car from a tablet or smart phone.  And inVIRONMENT so they can control their Vintage Air Gen-IV from their touch screen.  They have the cells strategically located in the car to optimize the wiring harness and get them the most features.

We had a chance to talk to Chris Brown of Brown Auto Design at the Autorama.  Chris is the mastermind behind the design of this car.  He mentioned to us that he had very limited room to run wires in the car.  Using the Infinitybox system made wiring the car much easier for him and his team.

1955 Chevy Bel Air wired with the Infinitybox System

1955 Chevy Bel Air wired with the Infinitybox System

We are very proud to be a part of this project.  Congratulations to Bob and the entire team at Matranga Hot Rods for making it to the Great 8.

Click on this link to contact our team to learn more about wiring your car with our Infinitybox system.

1955 Chevy Bel Air wired with the Infinitybox System

1955 Chevy Bel Air wired with the Infinitybox System

Infinitybox Cell Outline Drawings

This blog post has the outline drawings for our Infinitybox MASTERCELL, POWERCELL and inMOTION Cell.  You can use these drawings to plan the layout of these cells in your car or truck project.  All of the dimensions on these drawings are in inches.

The basic footprint for the MASTERCELL, POWERCELL and inMOTION cell is exactly the same.  The mounting tabs for all three cells are identical.  The holes in the mounting tabs are designed for a 1/4″ X 5/8″ shoulder bolt.

Outline dimensions for the Infinitybox MASTERCELL

Outline dimensions for the Infinitybox MASTERCELL

Outline dimensions for the Infinitybox POWERCELL

Outline dimensions for the Infinitybox POWERCELL

Outline dimensions for the Infinitybox inMOTION Cell

Outline dimensions for the Infinitybox inMOTION Cell

 

You can download PDF versions of these drawings at these links.

MASTERCELL

POWERCELL

inMOTION Cell

Click on this link to contact our technical support team if you have any additional questions about our Infinitybox system.

POWERCELL

Our 20-Circuit Kit is the core to the electrical system in your car.  It is more than just a wiring harness.  It is a universal wiring system that gets you the most advanced, functional and reliable electrical control on the market.  The 20-Circuit Kit starts with our MASTERCELL, which connects to your switches.  It also includes two of our POWERCELLs, which we call the muscles of your system.  The MASTERCELL sends commands to the POWERCELLs to locally power your lights, ignition, starter solenoid, cooling fans, fuel pumps, horn and other accessories.  We’ve talked about the MASTERCELL in more detail in a recent blog post.  You can link to that here.  This post is going to cover more details about our POWERCELL.

The 20-Circuit Kit includes 2 POWERCELLs.  Each POWERCELL can control 10-outputs.  One POWERCELL is for the front of the car, the second is for the rear of the car.  The front POWERCELL is set up to control your headlights, high-beams, turn signals, front running lights, horn, cooling fan, ignition power, starter solenoid and dash power.  The rear POWERCELL is set up to control your rear running lights, turn signals, brake lights, fuel pump, back-up lights, dome lights and other accessories.

Connecting your loads to the POWERCELL is very easy.  You run the output harness from the POWERCELL to your light, fan, pump or other accessory.  You cut our universal harness to length.  You connect our output wire to the wire on your load.  That’s it.  Click on this link to get more details on connecting your POWERCELL outputs to the electrical loads in your car or truck.

You put the POWERCELLs in the car were you need them.  This lets you eliminate size and weight of the wiring harness in your car.  The installation is simpler because the runs of wire are shorter and troubleshooting is easier.

The POWERCELL is a remote fuse and solid-state relay box.  The fuses that you need to properly protect your wiring harness are built into the POWERCELL.  You do not need to add separate fuses.  Also, the solid-state relays that control your loads are built into the POWERCELL.  Each output can carry up to 25-amps continuously so you do not need to add external relays to control your lights, fans, pumps and other accessories.  Also, we don’t use mechanical relays in our POWERCELLs.  Our outputs are controlled by solid-state MOSFETs.  This are rugged and reliable and give you tons of benefits over traditional relays.  Check out this link to learn about some of the advantages of a MOSFET.

This video walks through more of the details of the Infinitybox POWERCELL.

You can easily add extra POWERCELLs to your 20-Circuit Kit if you need to expand the output capacity beyond 20.  Each additional POWERCELL gives you 10 more outputs to your Infinitybox system.  The POWERCELL kit includes the POWERCELL plus all of the harnessing required to connect to your existing 20-Circuit Kit.  You can learn more about the POWERCELL kit by clicking this link.

We have the solid model for the POWERCELL available to our customers to help with their planning and mocking up process.

If you want to purchase our Infinitybox system or have technical questions, you can click on this link to contact our team.

Fuel Pump

Now it is time to wire the fuel pump to the POWERCELL in our 1967 Mustang project.  This is the last major output that needs to be wired in.  In our next series of posts, we will be talking about wiring the switches to the MASTERCELL.

There are lots of different kinds of electric fuel pumps for cars and trucks.  Primarily, they fall into two categories: in-tank and in-line.  These are pretty self-explanatory.  In-tank fuel pumps are mounted in the fuel tank.  In-line fuel pumps are installed somewhere in the fuel line running between the tank and the engine.  Our customer is using an Aeromotive 325 Stealth In-Tank Pump for this project.

Aeromotive Stealth Fuel Pump

Aeromotive Stealth Fuel Pump

Just like everything else in your car, thoroughly read and understand the manual that came with your fuel pump before you start this part of the install.  Remember that you are playing with Gasoline.

Wiring for the fuel pump is pretty simple.  The fuel pump needs battery power and ground.  The battery power is going to come from a POWERCELL output.  The ground connection is going to be made locally to the chassis.

This Aeromotive pump has two wires: red and black.  Black is ground and that is going to connect to the chassis.  Remember how important good ground connections are.  Make sure that you have a reliable metal-to-metal connection between your ground wire and the chassis.

The red wire is power.  This is going to connect to a POWERCELL output.  In most of our configurations, this power comes from output 10 on the rear POWERCELL.  This is the tan wire on the A connector.  The advantage of using our system to power the fuel pump is that the pump gets connected to the local POWERCELL.  The fuse and relay for that pump are built into the POWERCELL.  If you have a POWERCELL mounted in the rear of the car, the power wire going to the pump is very short.

We need to make a few comments about current draw.  Take a good look at the manual or specifications for your fuel pump.  You have 25-amps of steady-state current draw to work with on each POWERCELL output.  Aeromotive publishes great graphs in their manuals that show current draw and fuel flow versus pressure.  At the highest flow rate and highest pressure, this pump draws about 16-amps.  This is well below the 25-amp capacity of a single POWERCELL output.

In some cases, you need to provide power to the fuel level sender in the tank.  If yours needs to be powered, you can splice off the fuel pump output on the POWERCELL.  It is a good time to wire sender power if needed while you’re wiring power to the pump.

That’s it for wiring the fuel pump output.  We’ll talk about wiring the fuel pump trigger to the MASTERCELL in upcoming blog posts.  Click on this link to contact us with questions or comments.

Horn

This is a really easy one.  It’s time to wire the horn on this 1967 Mustang project.  This post is going to talk about how to connect the horn output on the POWERCELL to the terminals on the horn.  It is pretty straight forward.

There is a dedicated output in your 10 or 20-Circuit Wiring Kit for the horn.  In the standard front-engine configuration, it is the orange wire on the front POWERCELL.  This is output 9 on the A connector.  Check the configuration sheet that came with your kit to verify this output.  When the MASTERCELL sees the horn input wire grounded, it sends a command to the front POWERCELL to turn the horn output on.  This applies battery voltage to the horn which makes it sound.  When the horn button is released, the MASTERCELL sees the input wire come off of ground.  The MASTERCELL sends a command to the POWERCELL to turn the horn output off.  Pretty simple.

You are going to run the horn output from your front POWERCELL to the horn mounted in the car.  Most horns have two terminals on them.  One is the switched battery power.  The other is ground.  This picture shows an example horn.  This is the Wolo 315-2T.  The 2T stands for two terminal.

Example of a Wolo Horn

Example of a Wolo Horn

You can see the two terminals in the upper right of the picture.

Most horn terminals are 1/4″ male Quick-Disconnect connectors.  You simply strip the POWERCELL output wire and crimp on a female Quick-Disconnect connector.  Some companies refer to these terminals as Push-On.  Others call them Fast-On terminals.  This picture shows an example of these terminals.

Fast-on female terminal

Fast-on female terminal

You can source these terminals from companies like Del City or Waytek Wire.  Make sure that you are getting the right width of terminal.  You also have to make sure that the terminal is the correct size for the gauge of wire.  Our POWERCELL outputs use 14-AWG wire.  Terminals to mate with 14-16 Gauge wire are usually blue.  Pink or Red terminals are usually for 18-22 Gauge wire.  We recommend using these insulated crimp connectors.  You can use un-insulated terminals but we suggest applying heat-shrink tubing over the terminal to insulate the joint.  You do not want to risk the terminal connected to the POWERCELL output accidentally touching the chassis.

Also, make sure that you are using the correct tool to make this crimp.  As noted in other blog posts, you want to stay away from Radio Shack and Home Depot for car wiring.  This includes for tools.  Also, don’t just use a pair of pliers to crimp these terminals.  A good crimp tool is an important investment and will save you problems down the road.  This link will take you to a good quality crimp tool for these types of connectors.

The other of the two terminals on the horn needs to go to ground.  There is no polarity on a horn so you can connect the POWERCELL output and the ground wire to either of the two terminals.  Use the same Quick-Disconnect connector that you did for the POWERCELL output to connect the ground.  Remember that the size of the ground wire should be the same as the size of the wire feeding the horn.  That is good practice for any electrical connection.  On the other side of the ground wire, crimp on a ring terminal and use a bolt to attach this to the chassis.  Make sure that you have a good, metal-to-metal connection from your ground wire ring terminal to the chassis.  You must remove all dirt, rust, paint, powder coating, oil and grease from the connection.

The example that we used above was for a two-terminal horn.  You connected the POWERCELL output to one of the terminals on the horn.  The other connected to ground.  There are some horns that only have a single terminal on them.  That terminal connects to the POWERCELL output.  The horn grounds to the chassis through its mounting bracket.  The same rules for grounding apply.  You must have a clean metal-to-metal connection between the horn bracket and the chassis.

That’s it for this one.  We’ll talk about wiring the MASTERCELL input wires in upcoming posts.  If you have questions or comments about this post or any of the other steps in wiring this 1967 Mustang, please click on this link to contact our team.

Parking Lights

In our last post, we talked about wiring the headlights and high-beams to the front POWERCELL in your Infinitybox system.  Now it is time for you to wire the parking lights.  What we call parking lights can be called a few different things.  Some guys call them marker lights, some call them running lights or driving lights.  We call them parking lights.  These are the amber lights on the front of your car and the amber or red lights on the rear of your car.  Essentially, you are going to wire them the exact same way that you did for your headlights and high-beams with a few important exceptions.

There are parking lights on the front of your car and on the rear of your car.  Instead of running wire from the front to back of your car to power these lights together, we have dedicated outputs on the front and rear POWERCELLs for these lights.  In the case of our 1967 Mustang project, we power the front parking lights from the POWERCELL in the driver’s fender.  The rear parking lights come from the rear POWERCELL mounted in the trunk.  In both cases, the runs of wire are very short.

Remember that the switch does not connect to the lights.  The switch connects to the MASTERCELL.  We’re going to get into wiring the switches in upcoming blog posts.

In configuration that we are using for this 1967 Mustang, the parking lights are on outputs 6 on the front and 6 on the rear POWERCELL.  These are the yellow wires.  Click here to read the blog post that talks about the configuration sheet.  Run your parking light output wire to the the closest parking light on that side of the car, then splice off of that to go to the second parking light on that side of the car.  The parking light output is going to connect to both the left and right parking light bulbs.  These are wired in parallel.  The other wire in the parking light harness needs to get connected to ground.  Check the documentation that came with your lights for the proper wires for power and ground.  If you are using LED parking lights, the polarity is very important.  LED lights will not work if they are wired backwards.  You can see the headlight blog post to talk about ways to tap between the left and right lights on the car by clicking here.

You are going to use the parking light outputs from the front & rear POWERCELLs to power the lights.  You are also going to tap off of these POWERCELL outputs to power other illumination in the car.  Each POWERCELL output has capacity for 25-amps.  Most parking lights draw about one amp so you have lots of room to spare.

In the front of the car, you are going to tap off of your parking light output to power the gauge illumination and your dash illumination.  That way, you have lights on your gauges and dash when your parking lights are on.  In the rear of the car, you are going to tap off of the parking light output to light your license plate light and any other running lights on the back of the car.

This illustration shows you how the front & rear parking light outputs connect from the two POWERCELLs in the car.

Diagram showing how to power your parking lights from the Infinitybox system.

Diagram showing how to power your parking lights from the Infinitybox system.

We wanted to add a few comments about splicing and tapping off wires in your harness.  We do not recommend products that pierce the wire insulation for making taps.  This is a decent way to make splices in low current applications in sealed enclosures for telecom systems.  We do not recommend these types of taps or splices for the automotive environment.  Vibration, temperature, oil, dirt and grease will cause these taps to fail over time.  We recommend that you use crimp connectors or solder these splices.  If you used either of these methods, the joints should be protected and covered with heat-shrink tubing.

Another great option for creating a sealed junction point is to use our Infinitybox Splice Saver Kit.  This is a simple way to join multiple wires together in a sealed connector.  This pictures shows you an example of how to splice multiple lights to your single parking light output on your front POWERCELL using the Splice Saver Kit.

Wire diagram showing how to wire front parking lights and illumination with the Infinitybox Splice Saver Kit

Wire diagram showing how to wire front parking lights and illumination with the Infinitybox Splice Saver Kit

This picture shows you how you can use the Splice Saver Kit to wire your rear parking lights.

Wiring diagram showing how to wire parking lights and brake lights with an Infinitybox Splice Saver

Wiring diagram showing how to wire parking lights and brake lights with an Infinitybox Splice Saver

Click on this link to contact our team with questions or comments about wiring your parking lights with our Infinitybox system.